August 4, 2020

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It is evident that in all the consolidated democracies, as in the case of Spain, the government that wins the elections must impose its mark on governance, but must do so within the Constitution and the laws. It is something that the Catalan Government of the Generalitat seems to have forgotten. Power must be exercised respecting the laws; forgetting it, and attacking the monarchy, takes away the prestige that we had. The state funeral yesterday Thursday 16th allowed us to see once again that the European authorities recognize Spain as an indisputable rule of law, even though our pro-independence activists deny it. Governing while respecting the laws and the constitutional order are two essential elements of any rule of law. Forgetting it attacking even the parliamentary monarchy that we have takes away the prestige that we had in the past.

Francesc Granell 17/07/2020

Joaquim Forn, Josep Rull and Jordi Sànchez after leaving Lledoners (Pau Venteo / EP)

The results of the Galician and Basque elections of this past July 12 have highlighted that in Galicia and the Basque Country, the lists of the parties that until now had governed and which, as is normal in all campaigns, have received support from the polls. Electoral officials had insisted that if they returned to govern, they would do so so that all would benefit from their government action and not only those who had given them their vote.

It is evident that in all the consolidated democracies, as in the case of Spain, the government that wins the elections must impose its mark on governance, but must do so within the Constitution and the laws. It is something that the Catalan Government of the Generalitat seems to have forgotten.

Power must be exercised respecting the laws; forgetting it, and attacking the monarchy, takes away the prestige that we had

The state funeral yesterday Thursday 16th allowed us to see once again that the European authorities recognize Spain as an indisputable rule of law, even though our pro-independence activists deny it.

Meanwhile, in Catalonia the visit announced by some newspapers to the Girona and Barcelona has not come to fruition because, I suppose, the Royal House did not want a confrontation with parties that make up the Catalan Government – on the eve of the expected table of Madrid-Barcelona negotiation–, as well as with other pro-independence groups and entities such as the CUP, ANC, Òmnium and the CDR, who have launched into a regrettable exercise of criticizing the eventual visit of the Kings, imposing their vision that the King has not helped his unconstitutional idea of ​​an independent Catalonia. These sectors forget that Felipe VI is legitimized not only by the 1978 Constitution but by his proclamation as king of Spain by organic law 3/2014 of June 18 approved by a very large majority in the corresponding session of the Cortes Generales. A much larger majority, by the way, than the one that allowed Pedro Sánchez’s inauguration to preside over the Government.

It is okay for political parties to fight corruption of the King Emeritus and to strive to improve governance, but what they cannot do when they come to power is to exercise it thinking only of satisfying those who are of their own political color without respecting minority rights and openly working against the Constitution and court rulings.

Governing while respecting the laws and the constitutional order are two essential elements of any rule of law. Forgetting it attacking even the parliamentary monarchy that we have takes away the prestige that we had in the past.

https://www.lavanguardia.com/politica/20200717/482339957993/gobernar-para-todos.html

OpenKat

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