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The Jacobin left has come together this Monday against the future amnesty law in an event organised by El Jacobino at the Carlos de Amberes Foundation (Madrid). Historic socialists have raised their voices against what they consider a measure "that is not acceptable from a democratic point of view" because "the rule of law is being called into question and the law is being broken as an element of equality, and that is not progressive either".

Marcos Ondarra, 6 November 2023

Members and sympathisers of El Jacobino organise an event against the PSOE’s “betrayal” of the Left

The Jacobin left has come together this Monday against the future amnesty law in an event organised by El Jacobino at the Carlos de Amberes Foundation (Madrid). Historic socialists have raised their voices against what they consider a measure “that is not acceptable from a democratic point of view” because “the rule of law is being called into question and the law is being broken as an element of equality, and that is not progressive either”.

Guillermo del Valle, spokesperson for the platform, was flanked by former PSOE MP and former director of ‘El Socialista’, Pedro Bofill; former MP and general coordinator of IU Madrid, Ángel Pérez; and the MEP and former Socialist parliamentary spokesperson, Soraya Rodríguez.

Together they have rejected “the tricky dichotomy” put forward by the PSOE, which is “either a government together with xenophobic parties, fiscal insolidarity and reactionary nationalists or a government of PP and Vox”. El Jacobino aspires to set itself up as “an alternative committed to equality”: “From positions of commitment to workers, to the fight against precariousness, for social justice, for public services and redistribution, it is not understood that a social agenda is possible with the whitewashing of those who carried out a coup d’état, tried to break redistribution and continue today to call for a deepening of political asymmetries and social and economic inequalities”.

Nationalism is “anti-politics”.

Ricardo García Manrique, Professor of Philosophy of Law at the University of Barcelona, broke the ice in defence of an option that could satisfy a great many citizens. Manrique defined nationalism as “anti-politics”, in that “it wants to break our social contract, our constitutional framework, and if this happens, no politics will be possible”. That is why he argued that the left should “actively combat” nationalism, and not embrace it as a travelling companion.

The communist Ángel Pérez, with his characteristic sharp and biting words, attacked the “failed populism” of Podemos, which, in his opinion, has been assimilated by the PSOE. The official left, he argued, “has impregnated politics with pseudo-ideology, has replaced reality with desire and has resorted to the facile discourse of the spectre of fascism”. In the face of this, and as a good Marxist, he defended El Jacobino as a project that “starts from the material basis of the problems” to “defend equality, solidarity and social justice”.

“Coup d’état”.

Isabel Fernández Alonso, professor of Communication at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, also took part in the event, but it reached its climax with the intervention of Fernando Múgica, who spoke of a “coup d’état” perpetrated by the “tyrant” Pedro Sánchez together with a -Catalan- aristocracy that possesses “the ancient privilege of committing crimes and not being judged”. “We don’t accept it, let them go home,” he said, drawing applause from the audience.

Francesc de Carreras also spoke of a “coup d’état”, but in reference to the one committed by the leaders of the ‘procés’ in 2017, which took place “against Spain and against half of Catalonia”. The intellectual blamed the PSOE for promoting a measure that was “unconstitutional” by “seven votes”. “Hard times are coming”, he predicted.

Referendum warning

Perhaps with this warning he was referring to the referendum on self-determination. Laura Rodríguez Montecino has expressly spoken out about this, warning that it would mean “putting an end to Spanish sovereignty”, allowing “a few to decide on something that belongs to all of us”. To those who do not believe that the PSOE would give in to this demand, she reminded them: “All the things that seemed unusual to us have been fulfilled, so why should it be any different?”

Finally, Soraya Rodríguez rejected the dichotomy between a government of Pedro Sánchez or Vox, since “this is not about right or left, but about democrats, and democrats have different ideologies”. In this sense, she called for major pacts between PSOE and PP that represent “80% of Spanish citizens”. “With those who can never be negotiated with is secessionist nationalism”, she concluded.

The Jacobin future

Although Francisco Igea,  the driving force behind Nexo, was present at the event. ‘El Jacobino’ has made it clear that its intention is to run under its own name in the European elections of 2024. “We want to join forces, this is not a sect, but our project is not centre-right”, said Jacobin sources.

The event ended at around 8 p.m., which is just when a rally began in front of the PSOE headquarters in Madrid’s Calle de Ferraz..Despite initial jokes, none of the Jacobins finally went there to continue their protest against the amnesty.

https://theobjective.com/espana/politica/2023-11-06/izquierda-jacobina-amnistia-golpe-esatdo/

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